Tumbl_bee/tumbl_BRI

archiemcphee:

Kawaii! These little kitties aren’t just unbelievably cute, they’re also edible. They’re made by a Japanese mom named Caroline for Neko no Hi or Cat Day, which takes place each year on February 22nd.

Cat-shaped treats seem like a wonderful way to celebrate how much you like your feline friends. These treats are cat-shaped nerikiri, which is “a traditional Japanese sweet made by mixing shiro-an (sweetened white bean paste) with gyuhi (made of glutinous rice, similar to mochi but softer).” Caroline sculpts her nerikiri cats and kittens into various sizes and poses and then uses edible dyes to add distinguishing markings and fine details. She even makes little accessories for them, like tea sets and pillows for extra-comfy lounging.

Based on the effort that goes into making these sweets, it seems likely that Caroline’s family probably has at least one real life cat of their own and we’re guessing it leads a wonderfully spoiled life.

Visit RocketNews24 for additional photos.

cyanotype-thrill:

Little Library, Todd Pattison. 2009. Found and altered early 19th-century leather binding with fore-edge clasps. The bookshelves of the altered binding hold seventy-two blank leather- and paper-covered books which open and range in height from 1” to 1.5”.

Source

allthingseurope:

Goslar, Germany (by roba66)

inacom:

Bibliothèque nationale de France, Français 22971, f. 60v (Sri Lanka). Secrets de l’histoire naturelle. Cognac, c1480-1485. Artist: Robinet Testard. snail houses.

inacom:

Bibliothèque nationale de France, Français 22971, f. 60v (Sri Lanka). Secrets de l’histoire naturelle. Cognac, c1480-1485. Artist: Robinet Testard. snail houses.

allthingseurope:

Norway (by sulo~)

allthingseurope:

Rosenborg Castle, Denmark (by Thomas Roland)

scienceisbeauty:

Chicken (gallus gallus domesticus) beauty.

Photographer: Ernest Goh (check out his Facebook page)

Via Huffington Post (Photographer Explores The Surprising World Of Chicken Beauty Pageants)

roachpatrol:

archiemcphee:

Forget Google Glass, Android Wear, Smartwatches or contact lenses that give you night vision. Instead let’s talk about the awesomeness that is this 17th century Chinese abacus ring. It’s wearable tech from the Qing Dynasty, perhaps the world’s oldest smart ring.

Measuring a mere 1.2 centimeter-long by 0.7 centimeter-wide, the miniature abacus is a fully functional counting tool, but it’s so tiny that using it requires an equally dainty tool, such as a pin, to manipulate the beads, which are each less than one millimeter long.

"However, this is no problem for this abacus’s primary user—the ancient Chinese lady, for she only needs to pick one from her many hairpins."

[via Fashionably Geek and Gizmodo]

oh my god ancient chinese ladies knew where it was at

tentaclesandteacups:

elosilla:

♡ ♡ ♡ ♡ 

Aaaaaaaaaaah !!

nybg:

plasticpony:

Art nouveau flower shop, Brussels

HOLY **** LOOK HOW BEAUTIFUL THIS IS

Gettin’ ideas for the next iteration of our Shop in the Garden. Hrm. Is anyone out there a fanciful metalworker with an encyclopedic knowledge of elven aesthetics a la Tolkien? —MN

(Source: merristueller)

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